What’s A Credit Union

A credit union is a cooperative financial institution, owned and controlled by the people who use its services. These people are members. Credit unions serve groups that share something in common, such as where they work, live, or go to church.

Credit unions are not-for-profit, and exist to provide a safe, convenient place for members to save money and to get loans at reasonable rates. Credit unions, like other financial institutions, are closely regulated and operated in a very prudent manner. The National Credit Union Share Insurance Fund, administered by the National Credit Union Administration, an agency of the federal government, insures deposits of credit union members at more than 11,000 federal and state-chartered credit unions nationwide. Deposits are insured up to $100,000.

What makes a credit union different from a bank or savings & loan? Profits from banks and Savings & Loans are returned to the stockholders of the bank. Credit Unions return their profits back to their members in the form of higher paying dividends or lower lending rates.

NOTICE OF CHANGES IN TEMPORARY NCUA INSURANCE COVERAGE FOR TRANSACTION ACCOUNTS

All funds in a “noninterest-bearing transaction account” are insured in full by the National Credit Union Administration through December 31, 2012. This temporary unlimited coverage is in addition to, and separate from, the coverage of at least $250,000 available to members under the NCUA’s general share insurance rules. The term “noninterest-bearing transaction account” includes a traditional share draft account (or demand deposit account) on which the insured credit union pays no interest or dividend. It does not include any transaction account that may earn interest or dividends, a negotiable order of withdrawal (“NOW”) account, money-market deposit account, and Interest on Lawyers Trust Account (“IOLTA”), even if share drafts may be drawn on the account. For more information about temporary NCUA insurance coverage of transaction accounts, visit www.ncua.gov.